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Get Ready for Summer

Don’t wait until your AC breaks. Take advantage of our Spring Specials to help you keep cool this summer. We have specials on a new Lennox system, rebates, and more. Call us at 718-761-2300 to get a free quote or fill out our contact form.

Whole House Humidifiers

A whole house humidifier brings many benefits to your home. Even in the Spring, a whole house humidifier can come in handy with regulating the humidity of your home. At Gregg Mechanical, we offer our customers only the top quality in home accessories.

You may not think about it, but a whole house humidifier serves more than the benefit of preserving the moisture in air of your home. With the preservation and control of humidity, you and your family will be less likely to catch viruses, the common cold, a sore throat, or even cracked and itchy skin that usually occurs when the air in your home is too dry; especially with cases of allergies that are common for this time of the year, having a whole house humidifier can ease agitation of your allergies.

The dry air that’s in your house can also cause possible damage to the furniture in your home, such as: hardwood flooring, paint, plaster, and even electrical items. In addition, by having a whole house humidifier in your home leads to lower costs on your heating/cooling bills as you won’t have to fuss around with the thermostat as much; by having the humidifier regulate the air in your home, it causes the temperature in your home to settle to a comfortable setting.

aprilaire-model-700-humidifierFurthermore, a whole house humidifier is beneficial in that it is installed right into the heating and cooling ducts in your home, which means that you no longer have to have individual humidifiers placed throughout the rooms of your home. We also carry Aprilaire Humidifiers as well, and they are a fine example of another humidifier resource.

Whole House Humidifiers are an ideal product that can be used in any season, and you wouldn’t want to find yourself without one. For more information about our whole house humidifiers or any of our other products, feel free to give Gregg Mechanical a call at (718) 761-2300.

Peace of Mind Guarantee

 

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HVAC Terminology

AFUE
Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency. Used to express the efficiency of gas furnaces. The higher the AFUE rating, the more efficient the unit. Federal law has required that all new residential furnaces built after January 1992 operate with an AFUE of 78% or higher. 

If your furnace was built before 1992, chances are it is operating with an average efficiency of around 60%. Most of the heat is lost up the chimney or out the exhaust vent (devices used by older furnaces to expel dangerous fumes created by the furnace, such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, aldehydes, and even soot).

ARI
The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute is an organization created by HVAC manufacturers to ensure an acceptable level of quality within the industry. ARI is a voluntary, nonprofit organization which publishes ratings standards and benchmarks for testing cooling and heating products.

BTU
Short for British Thermal Unit. The amount of heat required to raise or lower the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit.

BTUH
The heat transfer rate of HVAC equipment is measured in British Thermal Units per Hour.

CAPACITY
Usually measured in BTUs or tons, capacity refers to an air conditioning or heating unit’s ability to cool or heat a space. For instance, a 4-ton air conditioning unit has twice the capacity of a 2-ton unit.

CFM
A unit to express movement of volume, including air, in Cubic Feet per Minute. A 400 CFM air handler moves 400 cubic feet in one minute.

COMPRESSOR
The compressor plays an integral role in cooling your home. It is the device responsible for pumping refrigerant through the refrigerant lines and the coil, making the transfer of heat from inside your house to the outdoors possible.

CONDENSER
The coil responsible for dissipating heat to the surrounding, outside air. Also called the condenser coil, or outdoor coil, its role is reversed when a heat pump is used in heating mode.

COP
The Coefficient of Performance rates a heat pump’s ability to efficiently use electricity in its operation. The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute provides the Coefficient of Performance at 47 degrees Fahrenheit and 17 degrees Fahrenheit. This is because a heat pump is more efficient at higher, outside-air temperatures.

dB
The relative loudness of a sound is expressed in dB, short for decibel. As an example, the sound of a human voice talking is around 70 dB. (See also SRN.)

DOE
A federal agency, the Department of Energy, sets the standards for efficiency throughout the HVAC industry and monitors consumption of energy sources.

DOWNFLOW
A term used to describe the direction of airflow through a furnace. A downflow furnace takes return air from the top, heats it and then delivers the warm air from the bottom.

DUCT/DUCT WORK/DUCTING
A central heating and air conditioning system uses many components to heat or cool air This warm or cool air is then transferred to different registers throughout the house via special flexible large-diameter pipes or ducts The system of ducts throughout your house is often referred to as ductwork or ducting.

EER
Energy Efficiency Ratio The ratio of the cooling capacity of the air conditioner in BTUs per hour to the total electrical input in watts This measure is determined by comparing test units to the Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute specifications.

EFFICIENCY
A general term used to describe how effectively a heat pump air conditioning system or furnace converts incoming energy to outgoing energy The higher the number the more efficient the unit and the lower the operating costs.

EVAPORATOR COIL/EVAPORATOR
An integral part of the indoor unit of a heat pump or air conditioning system. So called because when warm air passes over a coil filled with liquid refrigerant, the refrigerant itself evaporates and absorbs some of the heat. This gas refrigerant is then pumped to the outdoor coil, where it releases heat into the surrounding air and returns to its liquid state.

HEAT EXCHANGER
Responsible for transferring heat from furnace burners to the blower.

HSPF
Heating Seasonal Performance Factor. It measures the efficiency of the heating portion of your heat pump. The Department of Energy minimum is 6.8. (Similar to SEER.)

HUMIDIFIER
Usually available as an optional accessory, a humidifier is used to inject water vapor into the dry, heated air expelled from a furnace/air handler. The benefits can be improved efficiency and a more comfortable living environment.

HVAC
Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning. Used to refer to the industry at large, particularly dealers of heating and air conditioning equipment.

INDOOR COILS
Split-system home comfort systems use two main components to deliver air for a comfortable living environment. The indoor coil is the device responsible for transferring heat from indoors to the outdoors (or the reverse in the case of a heat pump in heating mode). Most modern systems are designed to achieve maximum efficiency when the indoor unit (coils and blower) is properly matched with the outdoor unit (air conditioner or heat pump). For best results, be sure to replace both the indoor and outdoor units at the same time.

K
A unit used to express 1,000 Watts. Denoted as kW.” Note that the W in ‘kW’ is always capitalized because the Watt unit was named after a person.

KWH
If a unit uses 1,000 Watts in 1 hour, it is said to have an energy rating of 1 kWh.

MODULATING FURNACES
Conventional furnaces are designed and rated to deliver the maximum heat for your comfort on the coldest of days. In most cases, however, those days account for fewer than three percent of winter days. The rest of the time, your furnace is providing more heat than necessary. Conventional furnaces are either off, providing no heat at all, or operate at full capacity.  Therefore, the temperature in your house goes up and down, by several degrees, adversely affecting your overall comfort and your energy costs.  Modulating furnaces solve this problem by varying the amount of BTUs (heat) delivered from the furnace based on the temperature requirements you have set on your thermostat. Typically the air flowing out of the registers modulates to provide more tempered air for a longer time, whereby providing you with continued comfort, based on the temperature you determine by setting your thermostat.  This results in lower operating costs, more comfortable temperatures throughout the house and quieter operation.

PACKAGE UNIT
Equipment in which all heating and cooling components are located in one cabinet. Installed either beside or on top of a home or business.

REFRIGERANT
The liquid used to absorb and transfer heat from one part of the home comfort system to another.

REFRIGERANT LINES
Copper lines used to transfer the refrigerant between the outdoor and indoor unit.  These lines should be inspected routinely to insure the armoflex insulation is covering the copper.

SEER
Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating. Used to express the efficiency of an air conditioning unit, or a heat pump in cooling mode. The higher the SEER rating, the more efficient the unit. The Department of Energy minimum is 13.0.

SPLIT SYSTEM
A home comfort system that uses an indoor and an outdoor component to deliver comfortable air to a living environment.

SRN
The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute performs tests and assigns a Sound Rating Number (SRN) to units. A lower SRN rating indicates a quieter unit with average SRNs of between 74dB and 80dB.

THERMOSTAT
A temperature-measuring device used to control the operation of home comfort systems to maintain a comfortable temperature within the house. Programmable thermostats allow you to program different temperatures for different times of the day.

TON
The ton ratings you see here have nothing to do with the weight of the unit. In fact a ton is simply 12,000 BTUs (see BTU definition on this page). A typical home cooling/heating system uses heat pumps or air conditioners with a capacity of between 1.5 and 5 tons.

UPFLOW
A term used to describe the direction of airflow through a furnace. An upflow furnace takes return air from the bottom, heats it, and then delivers the warm air from the top.

WATT/WATTS
Electrical power also expressed as ‘W’ For example a 100W globe consumes 100 Watts of electrical power The W in Watt is always uppercased, because it is named after a person.

ZONE/ZONING
A home may be divided into several different areas, or zones, to better control the temperatures throughout the house The process of dividing your home into different zones is called zoning.

How Does It Work?

Welcome to Gregg Mechanical Corp., Staten Island's premier Heating and Air Conditioning contractor for residential and business HVAC repairs and new installations.

Air Conditioning: How Does It Work?
When you first enter a home or building that is using air conditioning you feel two things in the air, coolness and dryness. Both of these physical sensations are accomplished by the air conditioning unit. Although you feel cooler that is not really what the unit does. It removes heat and in the process also pulls moisture from the air. In other words, the air conditioner does not cool the air it removes the heat from the air. In the absence of heat is cold.

Part of the benefits of utilizing a central air conditioning system is the filtration of the air in your home which improves air quality.  The filter cleans the air by trapping dust and other small particles that are pulled in through the return.  The more efficient the air cleaner, the better the air quality in your home.  The air handler, the indoor unit, circulates the air while cooling and dehumidifyng it through the process called refrigeration. 

Refrigeration
Refrigeration cools a home by transferring heat inside a home to the outdoors. All central air conditioners employ two main units in this process – the indoor unit and the condensing unit.

The indoor unit
This unit removes undesirable indoor warmth and humidity. It includes the filter, the air handler or furnace, and the evaporator coil. The air handler or furnace blow filtered air through the evaporator coil. The evaporator coil is kept cold by the circulation of a substance called refrigerant.  The fan passes air across this coil and any moisture will condense and collect on the coil's fins. In this process the heat that is in the air is pulled out from the air stream. The absence of the heat is now cooled or cold air is created.  The cooler, drier air that continues through the air ducts is vented throughout your home to maintain your desired comfort level. Depending on the structure of your home, the ductwork may be in the ceiling or on the side walls of your rooms.

The condensing unit
Outdoors, at the condensing unit, an air conditioner releases the heat that was captured inside at the coil. The same refrigerant that absorbed the heat indoors at low pressure is now pressurized by the compressor and is circulated through another coil, the condensing coil. In the condensing coil, under high pressure, the refrigerant releases its heat very quickly, making the coil itself hot. A fan blows across the coil, cooling its temperature down and transferring the heat to the outside air.

Furnaces: How Does it Work?
The furnace is the most important component of a central heating system. It houses all the working parts. So when you replace the furnace, you replace the vital operating parts of your heating system. It is by choosing from among the different models and brands of furnaces available that you determine the quality and cost of your business’s heating for years to come.

Furnace
The Furnace is part of a forced-air system. Warm air is forced, or blown, through a system of air ducts to each of the rooms in your home.  Air drawn into the furnace passes through a filter, where dust and other small particles are trapped. A blower unit blows the filtered air through the furnace, and the air absorbs heat and distributes it throughout your home.

Gas Heat
If it is a gas furnace, the heat is supplied by the burning of natural gas. A mixture of gas and air flows into the burner and is ignited by the pilot. Combustion occurs, and warm air from the burner flame rises to fill a chamber known as a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger becomes hot. Office air passing around the heat exchanger absorbs that warmth, continues into the air ducts and the heat is distributed through the business.The by-products of combustion pass upward through a venting system and escape through a vent in the roof.

Electric Heat
If the furnace is electric, heat is generated by an electric heating element. Electric current traveling through the element creates heat. By the heat transfer processes called conduction and convection, heat is transferred into the air stream and flows through the air ducts into the rooms of the business.

The Thermostat
Whether you heat your home with gas or electricity, a wall thermostat will be installed. This measures room temperature and turns the central heating system off or on as the temperature rises or falls to designated levels. Careful location of the thermostat is an essential consideration in maintaining maximum comfort levels in your home.

15 Point Gas Furnace Maintenance and Safety Check

15 Point Gas Furnace Maintenance and Safety Check

  1. Check and adjust thermostat.
  2. Clean and adjust all safety controls
  3. Clean burners and controls
  4. Clean and adjust pilot assembly
  5. Adjust burner for efficiency
  6. Check for gas leaks in furnace
  7. Lubricate moving parts
  8. Check belt and adjust tension
  9. Check filters
  10. Check draft pipe and draft diverter
  11. Check fan control
  12. Check manifold pressure
  13. Check furnace for cracked heat exchanger
  14. Check temperature rise
  15. Check complete furnace cycle

Routine Service

  • Maintains high efficiency
  • Lengthens equipment life
  • Avoids costly breakdowns
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